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Kurma's Spring Garden - 'Not Hard Being Chard'


Many people think that these handsome leafy red-stemmed fellows are beet leaves (called beetroot in Australia) but in fact they are rainbow chard, or sometimes called 'silverbeet' in Australia. I have 4 varieties - yellow-, red-, pink- and white-stemmed.

red chard:

I have always found chard very easy to grow, and the more plants I have, the more opportunity I can have for daily picking of outer, large leaves to add some interest, colour and nutrition to whatever I am cooking - whether it be soup, dal, curries, pasta sauce, noodles or in rice. In fact they are fine eating raw in salads as well.

like a rainbow:

The butterflies and snails and caterpillars also enjoy them, so I have to be diligent in keeping my eyes open for the hungry visitors. The parrots are always eyeing-off my fruiting plants like my roma tomatoes, but at least they don't seem to bother about green leaved plants.

my rainbow chard:

Hopefully the parrots won't be eating my broad beans, or else it will be all-out war. I don't feel like surrendering those after waiting 4 months for them to fructify.